GPLv3

xtide.el

xtide.el is an Emacs interface to the XTide program. M-x xtide displays a graph or other XTide output style in a buffer. A location selector chooses among locations known to XTide. There's a tie-in to M-x calendar adding a T key to display tides for the selected day, similar to S for sunrise and M for phase of the moon.

The XTide GUI does all this and more, so if you like that then there's no reason to switch. But on a TTY where the GUI can't run or if you just want to stay in Emacs then xtide.el is a nice way to browse tide times.

xtide.el is free software (free as in freedom), published under the terms of the GNU General Public License (v3 or up).

Download version 26 here, either just the .el,

  • FTP xtide.el (74k, and sig)
  • HTTP xtide.el
  • RSYNC xtide.el
  • Or from my ELPA archive.
  • Or a Debian package out of my repo, or the source for the package. The .tar.gz source includes some self-tests but just the .el is enough to run.
    xtide-el_26-0.1_all.deb (23k, and sig)
    xtide-el-26.tar.gz (54k, and sig)

    The sig files are Gnu PG ascii armoured signatures for each, generated from my key.

    See tcd-format.el for nosing around XTide's .tcd data files. The xtide.el location selector is one of the view modes where scroll-1.el is good too.

    xtide.el has an EmacsWiki page.


    The locations supplied with XTide have gradually decreased to USA only. If you have past harmonics files with more locations then they still work. Chuck the .tcd files in /usr/share/xtide (or wherever) alongside the current. Here's some to try

    XTide pre-2.6 like the 2004 snapshot ran from the text format harmonics. For current xtide use build_tide_db output.tcd input.txt to turn text into .tcd.

    Believe not every harmonics update has been in Debian, and not sure every intermediate Debian version is snapshotted anyway. Snapshots do go back as far as slink circa 2000 though. Initially a single xtide package, then the harmonics split out to xtide-data, then separate xtide-data-nonfree too.

    Apparently old harmonics can suffer drift so you may want to compare current times. In Australia for example compare tables from the BOM. Circa 2016 seems at worst about 10 minutes off.


    This page Copyright 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 Kevin Ryde, except for the GPLv3 logo which is Copyright Free Software Foundation and used here in accordance with its terms.

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